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1. Land use and biodiversity clusters influence microbial transformation processes in the soil.

2. All study sites in the exploratories have reached an ecological climax stage; therefore, an optimal microbial biocoenosis has developed at each individual site.

3. Although the composition of the microbial community in the rhizosphere of different grasses is very similar, the expression patterns of functional genes of bacteria, fungi and archaea differ significantly.


The aim of this project is therefore to investigate how microbial populations that catalyse nitrogen conversion in the soil have adapted to the respective quantity and quality of nitrogen applied. The aim is to clarify to what extent only changed expression patterns occur in the respective soils or whether entire population structures have changed. Furthermore, competition domains between different biota for nitrogen (especially between microorganisms and plants) are to be investigated more closely. In the long term, we also want to clarify how corresponding populations react to disturbances of the system (e.g. prolonged drought, heavy rainfall, etc.). We postulate that population structures have developed on the extensively managed areas that are better able to react to corresponding disturbances.


Doc
Der Einfluss der Landnutzungsintensität auf die Ökologie des mikrobiellen Stickstoffumsatzes in Grünlandböden
Meyer A., Focks A., Radl V., Keil D., Welzl G., Schöning I., Boch S., Marhan S., Kandeler E., Schloter M. (2013): Different land use intensities in grassland ecosystems drive ecology of microbial communities involved in nitrogen turnover in soil. PLoS ONE 8(9): e73536. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0073536
More information:  doi.org
Doc
Einfluss der Landnutzungsintensität auf die Diversität Ammonium-oxidierender Bakterien in Grünlandböden
Meyer A., Focks A., Radl V., Welzl G., Schöning I., Schloter M. (2014): Influence of land use intensity on the diversity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea in soils from grassland ecosystems. Microbial Ecology 67 (1), 161-166. doi: 10.1007/s00248-013-0310-4
More information:  doi.org

Scientific assistants

Prof. Dr. Jean Charles Munch
Project manager
Prof. Dr. Jean Charles Munch
Prof. Dr. Michael Schloter
Project manager
Prof. Dr. Michael Schloter
Technische Universität München (TUM)
Annabel Meyer
Employee
Annabel Meyer
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