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Land use intensification leads to a loss of species but also alters the phylogenetic and thus the functional composition of communities. Such changes may cause negative effects on ecosystem functioning. Hence an understanding of the relationships between intensification and the phylogenetic and functional composition of communities is important to forecast how changes in land use will affect the functioning of ecosystems.


H1:  Land use intensification causes phylogenetic homogenization of plant communities

H2:    Homogenization of plant communities causes phylogenetic homogenization of associated consumer communities


We will analyze BExIS data from core project Botany and Arthropods 1 sampled in 2008 and 2009 on the 150 experimental grassland plots. For plants and selected consumer communities phylogenies will be generated by combining already available phylogenies and by generating new sequence data. These phylogenies will be used for calculations of different phylodiversity estimates.


Doc
Egorov E. (2015): Community phylogenetics and invertebrate herbivory in managed grasslands. Dissertation, University Marburg
More information:  doi.org
Doc
Egorov E., Gossner M. M., Meyer S. T., Weisser W. W., Brändle M. (2017): Does plant phylogenetic diversity increase invertebrate herbivory in managed grasslands? Basic and Applied Ecology 20, 40–50. doi: 10.1016/j.baae.2017.03.004
More information:  doi.org
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Verringert die Intensivierung der Landnutzung die phylogenetische Vielfalt von Pflanzen auf Grünlandflächen?
Egorov E., Prati D., Durka W., Michalski S., Fischer M., Schmitt B., Blaser S., Brändle M. (2014): Does Land-Use Intensification Decrease Plant Phylogenetic Diversity in Local Grasslands? PLoS ONE 9 (7), e103252. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0103252
More information:  doi.org
Doc
Effects of biogeography, specialization and resource availability on the distribution-abundance relationship of phytophagous insects in managed grasslands
Friess N. (2013): Effects of biogeography, specialization and resource availability on the distribution-abundance relationship of phytophagous insects in managed grasslands. Bachelor thesis, University Marburg
Doc
Friess N., Gossner M. M., Weisser W. W., Brandl R., Brändle M. (2017): Habitat availability drives the distribution–abundance relationship in phytophagous true bugs in managed grasslands. Ecology 98 (10), 2561–2573. doi: 10.1002/ecy.1947
More information:  doi.org

Project in other funding periods

Scientific assistants

Dr. Martin Braendle
Project manager
Dr. Martin Braendle
Eugen Egorov
Employee
Eugen Egorov
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